How To Catch a Flamingo

In this video, I demonstrate the flamingo catch. The flamingo an under the leg variation. To perform the catch, plant on one leg, lift the other leg into the air at 90 degrees or more. Reach around behind your knee or ankle and make the catch.

This is a great catch for times when the disc is coming in low. It has a large window and is very visual. 

 

How to Do a Behind the Back, Right Hand Skid With Clock

 

In this video I explain how to do a behind the back, right hand skid with clock. This is an against the spin move that adds the extra restriction of pulling the disc behind the back before performing the against the spin pull.

To perform this trick, basically throw or set the disc on an angle at your left hip. Step forward with your left foot, reach behind your back and hook the rim with your nail. Now swing down and then back up. As you swing the disc up turn to your right.

Extra credit points if you can go from this move to another against the spin move.

The Against the Spin “Push” (Crank) to Invert Hold, by Lori Daniels

The inverted (nail) delay/hold is one of the “control” moves that many freestylers incorporate in their routines and jamming.  There are many ways to get into an inverted delay, and one way that is additionally difficult is to add an Against “push” of the disc from a center delay  (what’s also called an Against Crank) to an invert holding delay.  The way to do this is to establish a center delay (either clock or counter spin), then lower the disc to about waist-level of your body.  Then, walk around the disc while still maintaining the center delay.  (Imagine that your body moves around the disc more than the disc is moving)  By walking around the disc, you’ll naturally lower the disc even more in order to keep delaying the disc under your arm and then your hand will be now “inverted.” It may take some slight hand movements with your inverted hand to delay the disc in the center again, but with practice – this can be done.  The faster that you can move your body around the disc from the first center delay to the inverted hold at the end can make this a bit easier; but, just like every other freestyle move, timing is important. With a bit of practice walking around the disc, you’ll eventually be able to get the timing down to move both your body and the disc in order to get this move completed even faster. 

The Crank – Part 2 – Against the Spin – Left Hand Clock Spin

In this video, I demonstrate how to perform an against-the-spin crank with the left hand and clock spin. Of course, for counter spin, just mirror the same movement using the right hand.

Check this video for the basics of the crank and this video for the basics of against the spin. Okay, now that you’ve mastered those tricks, let’s dive into the against-the-spin crank.

Doing this trick with clock spin is the same body motion as doing a with-the-spin crank with counter spin. Likewise, doing this with counter on the right hand is the same body motion as doing a with-the-spin crank with clock spin.

Before trying the full movement, here’s a practice technique: Give yourself a steep back hand throw, about shoulder height. Reach out with your left hand, palm facing towards your back. Hook the rim with your nail. As the disc falls, drop your arm and slowly decelerate the disc. Then, when the hand reaches toward the bottom, turn your wrist inwards and pull the disc up. Accelerate the pull of the disc and propel the disc into the air. Do this until you are comfortable with the motion.

Now it’s time to attempt the trick. Start with the disc on a nail delay on your left hand. Lift it up push your nail forward to tip the nose away from you. The goal is to give yourself a similar disc angle to the practice throw you did above. As the disc reaches that angle, turn your hand over and let gravity pull the disc down. Allow the disc to accelerate and, when it has enough speed, decelerate and pull your wrist inwards, using the rim (if needed) to crank the disc through.

A couple notes: First, I seldom use the rim. Instead, my nail is about halfway between center and the rim. One cool thing about this is the that disc makes a large gyration as it goes against-the-spin. However, this took many attempts to master; in the beginning I was using much more of the rim. The second note is that it’s possible to do this trick 100% in the center. The disc mechanics (when doing this trick totally in the center) change a lot as it becomes about mastery of the center delay in all hand positions. I highly recommend practicing this as well. Lastly, as you improve, a good exercise is to do as many cranks as you can from a self throw. If you can get to 4 successful cranks, you have mastered this trick.

The Crank Part 1 – With the Spin

In this video, I describe the 4 basic, with the spin cranks. The crank is a nail delay move in which arm that is controlling the disc rotates either; up, around, and back under the arm pit or under the arm pit, back, around and down…its makes more sense if you watch it. The with the spin crank on the rim is a really good move to learn as a beginner. It will allow you to do many tricks and help you gain control over the nose of the disc.

Watch the video or read my written article about the cranks for more details.

Going Against the Spin

In this video I explain what an against the spin move is, and then describe how to do one of the easiest against the spin moves, the skid. To understand an against the spin move, it helps to have a little background.

Interestingly, a spinning disc on a nail delay (center or rim) will naturally gyrate in the same direction as the disc is spinning. Consequently, the easiest manner in which to manipulate the disc is to make movements that follow this spin pattern. For example, a with the spin crank on the rim is a fairly good move to learn early on since the disc will naturally move in the direction of the crank.

It is possible to force the disc to gyrate against its natural direction. This is the crux of an against the spin move. It’s nail delay trick where the disc is forced against its spin. Since it requires such precision, many consider an against the spin move to be a restriction by itself.

The skid is one of the more basic against the spin moves that uses the rim delay. To practice a skid, throw yourself a steep backhand. For counter, throw left and skid right, for clock throw right and skid left. Throw it at about shoulder height, so the disc is about 45 degrees to the ground and to your body, with the top of the disc in view. Now, invert the skidding hand. Reach around and hook the rim with your nail. Meet the disc so your nail travels almost the same speed as the disc is falling so as to apply very little pressure. Now, swing your arm down and back up behind your back. As you swing back up, accelerate your arm speed and turn your body towards the disc. It will pop out from behind your back on the opposite side of your skid hand.

Stay tuned for more tutorials on against the spin tricks. If there are any in particular you’d like to know more about, let me know in the comments below. Also, you can see all other tutorials on again the spin here.

How to Catch a Triple Fake, by Matt

In this brief video Matt demonstrates how to catch a triple fake. It’s a nice alternative to under the leg or behind the back for a disc that is in the waist zone. As a blind catch, it can be more difficult than it looks. With practice, it looks quite graceful.

To execute, do a self set or have someone throw to you. Watch the disc. Reach across your stomach and around towards your back. As you reach, spin your body around to propel your hand towards the disc. Keep you eye on it as long as possible. As you begin to lose sight, snap your body around faster and make the grab.

Matt’s key is to pivot on one foot. Then, a simple bend at the knee allows for adjusting to the height of the disc.

Matt Teaches the Flamingitosis Catch

The flamingitosis is one of the most challenging catches. To understand it, it helps to break down the name; Flamingo – Gitis – Osis. A flamingo is when one plants on one leg and catches the disc behind the planted leg. A gitis is a variation of under the leg where the disc is caught around the outside of the leg opposite the catching hand. So right hand catches on the outside of the left leg and vice versa. So, a flamingosis is catching around the outside of the planted leg with the opposite hand. An osis is when one spins away from the catch so body rotation moves the hand in the direction as the disc is flying. Check the links for more details on each. Now put it all together and you have a flamingitosis.

Of course Matt, being the incredible jammer that he is, decided to add a double spin before he caught it. This is not a requirement. To fully understand the body mechanics involved, watch the video. There’s even a nice slow motion section. After Matt’s second spin you can see how he looks over his catching shoulder for as long as he can before his body blocks the view. Watching the disc as long as possible is the key to making this catch.

Another thing I find helpful is falling into the catch. The fall is not required, but for me it opens the window just a little more. You can see in the video, it works for Matt as well.

Matt Gauthier Teaches the Flamingosis Catch

Matt Gauthier teaches us about the famingosis catch. This is one of the more challenging catches to master. Also, it has a intriguing look due to the unique body rotation involved.

First, some nomenclature. The basic osis catch is covered here. It involves catching behind the back as one spins away from the disc. A similar spinning away movement can be applied to almost any catch. In this example, Matt is showing us the flamingosis, which is a flamingo with the osis style rotation. There is also gitosis, chosis (chair osis), bad attitosis, and probably a whole host of others. So, take your favorite catch and try to add an osis to it. It can open a whole new world.

Now for the flamingosis. Set the disc up and then spin. If you spin to the left, as Matt demonstrates, then plant on your right foot, kick your left foot out, and reach behind your right leg with your right hand and make the catch. As you spin, watch over your right should as long as you can, then flip your head around quickly and watch the disc into your hand over the left shoulder. Matt points out that the motion is very similar to a phlard. So, one way to begin is by catching a pharld but move your hand to the other side of your leg. This will help you with the motion.

There are also some subtle variations here. For example, the raised leg could travel over the disc before the catch is made. Or, it could move into position before the disc is low enough for the leg to go over. Or it could never go past the disc flight path at all. All are valid but it changes the aesthetic. My guess is that, with a little creativity there are other possible variations as well. If you think of any, please share in the comments below.

 

Ryan Young Explains How To Make Your Gitis Look Great

Ryan Young explains how to improve the look of a leaping gitis. Many people learn the leaping gitis without considering form. In fact, that’s my style…for me it’s traditionally about making the catch, with no thought to it looks. As a result, I look all compact and hunched over.

Ryan takes his gitis to another level by focusing on the form. Basically, as I understand it, the goal is to keep the knees straight, point the toes and kick the back leg backwards as you leap. This creates straight lines and splayed out look that is pleasing to the eye. I am certain Ryan learned this leap in ballet and has translated it into the gitis catch. In the video, Ryan goes over warmup and how to practice the form, even before trying to make the catch. Thanks to Ryan’s inspiration, you may see me trying to improve my form.